Bec in the library

"I have always imagined that paradise will be a kind of library." — Jorge Luis Borges

Study visit: Melbourne Museum Discovery Centre (DC) August 6, 2014

Yet another Melbourne gem that lay hidden from my prying eyes during university and my first year of teaching!

The DC is an absolute treasure trove, full of exciting hands on learning based on and around the Museum’s main collection. My four year old and almost two year old were transfixed with all the choices on offer – animal skeletons, ancient coins, insects in amber that could be studied under the microscope and so much more!

Truthfully, so was I. The more I think about it, the more I want my own library to be very similar to the DC. I absolutely loved how interactive each of the mini exhibits were. Patrons could use all five senses to explore objects then within a handspan, they had a collection of books and a list of websites where they could find out more. All that was needed was an iPad at each exhibit so that patrons could search immediately and it would tick all the boxes for inquiry learning.

Couldn’t you just imagine pairs of kids side by side investigating an animal skull by rolling it around in their hands, using the microscope to examine it in minute detail. One of the kids would have a question so could just swipe the iPad on, head to a database (maybe PebbleGo or WorldBook Animals) and start searching for an answer using some keywords (that were helpfully posted within the exhibit). Oh, the possibilities give me goosebumps!

More about the Discovery Centre

The MVDC is run in conjunction with the Discovery Centre at the Immigration Museum.

The variety of information requests is incredible, from genealogy to random insect identification – the staff list this diversity as the highlight of their working day.

To aid in easy partnerships with other libraries such as State Library of Victoria, and to reduce cost, the DC use Voyager as their LMS.

Much of the artefacts in the DC are not catalogued in any way as they are not deemed of historical value.

The DC staff’s constant Tweeting and blogging provide additional promotion for existing patrons.

Will and Charlie examine the coin collection.

Will and Charlie examine the coin collection.

Will is mightily impressed with the old coins.

Will is mightily impressed with the old coins.

Will loved helping colour the replica Aztec calendar.

Will loved helping colour the replica Aztec calendar.

MVDC - more coins!

Will was fascinated by the 'station' where he could view the preserved insects under the microscope.

Will was fascinated by the ‘station’ where he could view the preserved insects under the microscope.

Will couldn't get enough of this artefact station.

Will couldn’t get enough of this artefact station.

This small book collection is  provided by the Museum to complement the artefact collection but is rarely used.

This small book collection is provided by the Museum to complement the artefact collection but is rarely used.

This is an example of what a typical artefact station looks like.

This is an example of what a typical artefact station looks like.

Patrons can use the internet and the MV website to find out more.

Patrons can use the internet and the MV website to find out more.

 

Study visit: Melbourne City Library July 31, 2014

Tucked away in a little laneway, the City Library personifies city living.

Tucked away in a little laneway, the City Library personifies city living.

I love the aesthetics of this returns section.

I love the aesthetics of this returns section.

OK, so not really pretty but functional and the concept  of zones is great. This photo shows the "Melbourne", "Travel" and part of the "Food and Cooking" sections.

OK, so not really pretty but functional and the concept of zones is great. This photo shows the “Melbourne”, “Travel” and part of the “Food and Cooking” sections.

One of the children's librarians from another MLS branch was responsible for setting this up as there is no dedicated Children's Librarian at the City branch.

One of the children’s librarians from another MLS branch was responsible for setting this up as there is no dedicated Children’s Librarian at the City branch.

Next to the lift that enables equal access for all is a beautiful display of new and/or popular resources.

Next to the lift that enables equal access for all is a beautiful display of new and/or popular resources.

This is such a wonderful gift to the community - a large range of leveled readers for those members of the community (special learning needs, adult literacy learners, ESOL/EAL learners etc) for whom the rest of the collection is too challenging.

This is such a wonderful gift to the community – a large range of leveled readers for those members of the community (special learning needs, adult literacy learners, ESOL/EAL learners etc) for whom the rest of the collection is too challenging.

Browsing shelves

Books just fly off these shelves! Titles that have just been returned (or that need a bit of circulation and are lost on the shelves) get put here so that they are more visible to the general public. Love this promotion of great (or just popular) literature!

Books just fly off these shelves! Titles that have just been returned (or that need a bit of circulation and are lost on the shelves) get put here so that they are more visible to the general public. Love this promotion of great (or just popular) literature!

Cool.

You only need one word to describe this place.

It’s so many things to so many people! Yes, it’s tiny, poky even. But somehow that doesn’t make the charm rub off. The City Library is crammed to the roof with all sorts of library delights, a place where people of all shapes and sizes, interests and desires congregate to share, learn, relax and study. I stood in the entrance for about 10 minutes waiting for my guide to arrive and in that brief time, I had made eye contact with so many people as they came in the doors that I lost count.

For the first time, I saw what a (partially) zoned library looks like as City Library has a “Travel”, “Melbourne” and a “Food and Cooking” zone where resources, fiction and non-fiction are housed together, shelved by Dewey. I have to say that I’m a convert, especially in a public library context. As a tight-fisted browser-only of “all things foodie” , I love that there was a very clearly defined area apart from the general non-fiction section where I could rest my bones and surround myself with deliciousness.

I’m really interested to see how an entire library is set out in zones, as the newly opened MLS branch, Library at the Dock. According to my host, each zone is completely interactive with art installations, fiction, non-fiction and even performance spaces related to the zone. Wow, what a concept!

Specialist librarians are responsible for their respective collection development and management across all branches, using preselected suppliers.

The City Library’s online collection, shared with the other MLS branches is so large that the staff dub it their “sixth library branch”.

Their social media presence is growing in response to research showing community preference for online interaction.

 

Study visit: State Library of Victoria July 30, 2014

Shamefaced, I hang my head and admit that even though I lived Melbourne for 5 years, I never once visited this gem of an institution!

I had a few snafus with this visit which lead me to collecting my information in a variety of ways – through a woman in HR who met with me for an hour, various librarians on the library floor and yet more and different librarians online who helped me find answers to my many questions using the extremely handy “Ask a Librarian” chat feature!

Wow, what a place!

It makes my heart sing to know that people of all races, colours, ethnicities and languages can visit this wonderful space and learn, study, connect, dream, inspire and relax for free.

This is not only a conventional library, servicing standard information requirements but is also a place to immerse yourself in local and national cultural events, mostly for free.

SLV’s values of collaboration and innovation are mirrored by their vast collection housing resources of almost every kind.

Roving and stationary Librarians on the floor of the SLV are able to answer questions at the direct point of need to physical visitors. The online “chat” and “ask a librarian” features are both efficient and fast ways of getting information. It’s also a useful feature for users who have English as their second language or have a disability which impairs their ability to speak or hear or even physically access the library.

It is obvious from how detailed, organised and comprehensive the SLV’s website is, as well as reading research undertaken by the library, that they understand most of their patrons are wishing to access the SLV collection online.  This is an area of continued growth for the SLV, as outlined in their 2013-16 Corporate Plan.

SLV is extremely active on social media as their market research has shown that online marketing and promotional campaigns were more effective in increasing foot- and virtual-traffic.

Doesn't it feel like you're in the middle of Matthew Reilley's "Contest"?!

Doesn’t it feel like you’re in the middle of Matthew Reilley’s “Contest”?!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

So many of my favourite characters in this sculpture! (Grandma Poss and Hush in particular!)

So many of my favourite characters in this sculpture! (Grandma Poss and Hush in particular!)

 

The only sad thing about this sculpture is that it was kind of tucked away and I wanted it to be more centre stage.

The only sad thing about this sculpture is that it was kind of tucked away and I wanted it to be more centre stage.

 

Searching, searching, searching… August 22, 2013

ETL505 Module 2 – tools and systems

Search engines

Regardless of how effective other forms of information organisation and retrieval are, kids still rely on google, first and foremost.

Never mind the fact that our library has outstanding databases that have been thoroughly researched and written to be appropriate, kids still go to what is easiest and what they really do believe is going to be easiest. Grrr!

To be honest, I also blame the teachers! I see how little emphasis they put on our collection of databases and how easily they let kids rely on Mr Google, even without teaching them how to search EFFECTIVELY. We have a long way to go before our students are web learners instead of just web searchers.

 

Wowsers, spam tagging! I had never heard of that phrase before but it certainly explains some of the very dodgy hits I get occasionally when I use search engines!

Search by image?! Oh. how. cool. is. that?!

Screen shot of my "search by image" in Google

Screen shot of my “search by image” in Google

While my search didn’t bring up anything as cool as the Google intro video, I still love the concept. It would be extremely handy if you wanted to help someone identify a place or animal.

Music search engines

What rock have I been hiding under that I haven’t been utilising Pandora?! Created a “station” using the search tag of U2 and every.single.song that came up in the playlist caused me to squeal with delight! Maybe I was doing it wrong but I couldn’t see the search box for a specific song, just an artist/genre/composer.

Spotify required me to sign up and while I could access most of the mp3.com site, my computer lacked some kind of plug in or player to use the site to it’s fullest.

To be honest, if I’m looking up a song, I really like Shazam. Granted, you have to HEAR the song to use the app but at least the result is instantaneous.

Resources

‘Search engines’, pp. 53-54, of Hider, P. (2012). Information resource description. London: Facet.

 

Assignment 2: evaluative and reflective statement February 2, 2012

A) An evaluative statement using three (3) experiences documented in your OLJ as evidence of meeting the learning objectives of the subject

The OLJ tasks that best represent my understanding of social networking (SN) technologies are the ones in which I discuss how teacher librarians (TLs) can assist teachers to use RSS feeds to better themselves both as educators and as well rounded people, and my exploration of the strengths and areas of improvement of delicious. Above and beyond that, however, is the ‘off topic’ work I participated in during January. The exploration of FriendFeed (incorporating my burgeoning use of Twitter) and delicious, along with the creation of a new Facebook page on educational technology showed that I could competently navigate SN for my own purposes. This personalisation of SN will serve me well in transfering my new skill set into the school environment. The whole concept of using SN for the creation of my professional learning network (PLN) is exciting me beyond expectation and I am proudly flying my computer geek flag!

The Library 2.0 concept is so stimulating and the meme map included in one of my module response posts really helped me understand the concept more clearly. To my mind, the whole point of Library 2.0 is to use emerging and existing technology to better meet the information needs of my school. Library 2.0 and participatory library service is NOT about having the latest tool that does the coolest  new thing, faster and with a better interface than ever before. If it’s not relevant, if it doesn’t get users excited and pushing for more, then no matter how ‘cool’ a SN tool is, it will be a waste of time and effort and my teachers will simply turn their nose up at it. Knowing what your teachers need and when, then differentiating content and training for them based on those needs, is absolutely the best way to immerse schools into the concepts, theories and practices of Library 2.0 without instilling fear of change. I believe that the underlying principles of Web 2.0 can, and should be, mirrored by effective Library 2.0 TLs: education can only be better if we engage in collaboration, conversation, community and content creation (or co-creation). These practices must be part of the exploration process.  If teachers are creators, users who collaborate and converse in virtual and real life communities, then they are far more likely to use SN tools critically and for authentic purposes, not just because they are interesting or ‘the latest thing’. These values are reflected in my questioning and ruminations on how teachers can be part of best practice dialogue and action using RSS, delicious and other SN tools like FriendFeed. Bernoff and Li’s (2010) ladder concept was hugely influential in my understanding of how SN is both perceived and used.

To effectively scaffold my interpretation of Library 2.0, I must evaluate and know the features and functionality of any social networking reliant information tool or software and how that tool can best be used to meet the needs of their staff and students. I demonstrated that knowledge through my critical examination of delicious. This was especially evident when I highlighted how different aspects of the social bookmarking tool can be a help or hindrance when collecting information for units of inquiry. Additionally, in my RSS OLJ task, I clearly pointed out there were issues that needed to be solved in how teachers could authentically gather information that was personally relevant to them in one place. I also made clear in my marketing strategy post that professional developing in the SN area must be differentiated if the tools and training itself is to be on any use. 

Participating in SN means being cognizant of the inherent social, cultural, educational, ethical, and technical management issues that exist in a socially networked world. In my experience and opinion, these include, but are not limited to, privacy, cyber bullying, access to technology in and out of school, funding for staff and hardware/software, bias (in programming and in content), confidence levels and attitude, gender and age stereotypes, censorship and intellectual property. There is no bigger arena for these issues than when students and teachers are creators within the SN world. Collaborating and  communicating within a community, perhaps using a SN tool itself, such as delicious to discuss, analyse, evaluate and overcome these issues is paramount.

B) Reflective statement on your development as a social networker as a result of studying INF506, and the implications for your development as an information professional.

Funnily enough, the spark that ignited the flame of interest in social networking (SN) came right at the beginning of the subject but not necessarily as part of the subject! I was researching blogging in late November with the view that I would use it as the basis of my first assignment both in this subject and in EER500. I stumbled across a Sydney Morning  Herald article by Haesler (2011) which referenced the notion of personal learning networks (PLNs).The concept came at exactly the right time for me and drove my learning from then on.

Admittedly, my learning through this subject has come in fits and spurts, depending on the information need I had at any given time. Of course, I learnt a great deal through the modules, with regular a’ha moments steering me off on tangents of excitement. However, the real learning came when I could use the new SN tools I was exploring for real world purposes, in situations where my blood was really pumping and I pushed myself to go further, test the technologies more so that I could get the result I wanted. This was especially obvious in my delicious Stacks on positive parenting. Whilst, admittedly, this was not 100% work related, as a primary teacher, we are also surrogate parents so I guess it could come under the banner of parent education! I’m part of many parenting communities online, mostly consisting of members who are constantly in need of more information to inform and affirm their parenting. I loved having a tangible community service purpose for my own reading. Knowing my use of social bookmarking could potentially help another parent overcome hurdles is exhilarating and very gratifying. I am now looking ahead and planning how I can harness this energy and apply it to my professional life. The most obvious is helping teachers and grade levels organise their online resources into curriculum areas.

Blogging has always been my favourite use of social networking technologies, even before starting this course. When my husband and I started our lives as international vagabonds, we began a travel blog that allowed our families and friends to share our travels. This blogging experience helped me feel enthused about using an OLJ to record my learning in my M.Ed (TL) across many subjects, including this one.  My interest in blogging now goes beyond the personal. As witnessed in my first assignment for this subject, the benefits of educational blogging for primary aged students are huge. I am so excited to share my study with the school involved and be an active participant in seeing my recommendations a reality.

Facebook is another SN tool that has been enhanced through my involvement in this subject. I’ve been an avid facebooker for many years on a personal level, using it as another way to connect with distant loved ones. However, the innovative and, for me, game-changing use of facebook for educational purposes demonstrated in this course has helped me see how I can harness it’s power. I love the idea of teachers using the page I created – virtually schools – as a lead in to their own learning; a place where they can discuss and share ideas. I am planning on offering my services as ‘PLN facilitator’ to the teachers involved in my blogging case study and will use my facebook page as its beginning platform because I know all the teachers on the team are already comfortable with the tool.

One frustration I have experienced over the course of this subject has been the difficulty in relating much of what we are learning about to the primary school student. I’ve started a post collating relevant articles, information and ideas expressly for this purpose. I will add these to my Virtually School FB page for others to benefit from.

My own intense engagement with SN in both personal and professional contexts over the past six or seven weeks has made very clear to me, over and over again, how essential personal relevance is to the implementation of SN in schools. Teachers simply will not use a tool for a tool’s sake; they must see how it can be used to better their teaching and to make them a more efficient educator with the little time they have. My mission and catch cry going forward: personally relevant, educationally effective.

References

Bernoff, J., & Li, C. (2010, January 19). Empowered. Forrester Blogs | Making Leaders Successful Every Day. Retrieved February 1, 2012, from http://blogs.forrester.com/groundswell/2010/01/conversationalists-get-onto-the-ladder.html

Haesler, D. (2011, November 14). For today’s learners, it just clicks. The Sydney Morning Herald. pastedGraphic.pdfhttp://www.smh.com.au/technology/technology-news/for-todays-learners-it-just-clicks-20111113-1ndwi.html

 

Blogger MIA! February 1, 2012

Filed under: INF506 — becinthelibrary @ 8:31 pm
Tags: , , , , ,

So, February 1st is action day for this blogger. Posts are coming thick and fast. Why?

Because I’ve been MIA, stuck up in my own head, recovering from one of the most stressful university assignments known to man. For this little duck who detests academia, the concept of educational research is a true mind bender (I’m sure you could easily substitute the real word I’m thinking of here).

My last blog post before today’s flurry was Christmas Eve. In the meantime, whilst ‘becinthelibrary’ gathers dust, I HAVE been busy in the SN world, just very quietly and inbetween whacking out my INF506 case study and a big ole critical analysis of educational research methods. Also managed to flit between 2 countries, battle some nagging and persistent health issues and live for the better part of 4 weeks at my in-laws house whilst doing all this…

Here are the links to my forays into the SN world during January:

Virtually Schools facebook page – a FB page where I collect articles and blog posts from educators around the world who are innovating in the area of educational technology. I’m using it as a starting point for teachers who want to have some of their resources for their own PLNs but not sure how to make their own. I’ve got 5 likers so far. Just have to keep spreading the word and making sure I have relevant, engaging and CURRENT content!

My delicious stacks – you will see that most of these stacks are attachment parenting (AP) related, something extremely close to my heart and a ‘service’ I will share with my facebook AP communities as soon as all stacks have reached the 5 link minimum. I’m also super excited that one of my stacks comes up as a ‘featured stack’ when using ‘positive parenting’ as a search word. (OK, this seems like a no-brainer but it gave me such a boost!) Some of the stacks are library and/or edu tech related and I have one follower for one of these stacks. I get very excited by small achievements, you see!

 

OLJ: develop a draft marketing strategy for your organisation

Outline (in 350 words) how you can apply these ideas to develop a draft marketing strategy for your organisation.

First, let’s be very clear about what a marketing strategy would look like when your ‘product’ is an educational experience, not a physical artifact or object. To my mind,  my client base is the teachers I collaborate with and my goal is to get those teachers using a variety of SN tools to more effectively engage their students in the information literacy journey.

As with any big project, one first find out the needs and wants of the target audience. So, in my case, there are some key questions that must be answered before any marketing strategy is devised.

  • What do the teachers want and need from their use of social media when using it with their students?
  • Knowing that people will most likely only ever start from where they are comfortable, what skills and experience do the teachers already have with various social networking tools?
  • What do *I* have to learn before I can effectively facilitate the learning of others?

Next comes the synthesis and evaluation of the data to find out who needs and wants what. Further questions to help guide this section of the process could be:

  • How can I differentiate both the tools and the instruction for individual teachers?
  • What is the purpose behind the use of each tool that I propose to use?
  • How is this purpose backed by current research/practice in like schools?
  • What are the ways I can help teachers find ways to translate their personal SN use and knowledge to the classroom?
  • Teachers are already super busy – how can I outline the benefits of using SN without adding to their ‘to do’ list?

I know most teachers at my school would be fit into multiple rungs of Bernoff and Li’s ladder, especially  as conversationalists and spectators. There is a small percentage that are strong creators (along with 100% of our Grade 3-5 student blog creators). I am going to go out on a fairly strong limb and say that due to our school’s heavy emphasis on educational technology, NONE of my client base are ‘inactive’.  What a wonderful place to continue the journey to SN use in education!

***********************************

Josh Bernoff & Charlene Li’s Groundswell excerpt, followed by their post Social Technographics: Conversationalists get onto the ladder (19 January, 2010). In particular explore the different behaviours of social networkers articulated in their ladder.

 

 

 

 
loving the learning

continuing tales of a teacher librarian

PE to TL - The Journey Begins!

Reflections and thoughts on ETL401.

ETL507 PROFESSIONAL REFLECTIVE PORTFOLIO

This WordPress.com site is the bee's knees